VARIOUS REGIONS KNOTTING COMPARISONS

(And other information relating to carpets from Tibet, etc.)

On this page you will find comparisons of various types of knotting and / or weaving styles (and, eventually, other information relating to carpets from Tibet, etc, as seen on this site). One thing that certainly needs to be addressed is the unfortunate practice of people, who it would appear in some ‘sales’ circumstances should know better, describing Chinese woven carpets as ‘Tibetan’, and vice versa. And yes, although Tibet may now be part of China, the knotting style of their carpets is completely different from Chinese carpets as a whole, and for that matter almost every other carpet producing area in the world. And to be honest, we often find the back of a carpet more interesting and exciting at times than the front, as sometimes the very intricate weaving styles, even at times with large knots, leaves one in wonder and admiration at the artistry and skill of the weaver – and the dyer for that matter – all those years ago. Anyway, we are not going to go into detail regarding the ins and outs (no pun intended) of the different knots, as I am a big believer in a picture being worth a thousand words, so enjoy, and maybe if an uninformed person happens to stumble onto this page they will hopefully learn something.

NOTE: The individual ‘squares’ shown below are all one square inch (1″). And for all intents and purposes there are 15.5 square inches in one square decimeter, should one care to make that calculation themselves.

The image above displays a one inch square of the backs of four carpets woven in four different regions. From left to right; Tibet, Ningxia, Baotou-Suiyuan & Afghanistan (with one node of the Afghan knot being virtually invisible as it is almost hidden because of the  knot ‘depression’).

The image above displays a one inch square of the backs of four carpets woven in four different regions, with the arrow pointing to what the backside of just one single knot looks like. From left to right; Ningxia, Tibet, Baotou-Suiyuan & Afghanistan (with one node of the Afghan knot being virtually invisible as it is almost hidden because of the  knot ‘depression’).

The image above displays a one inch square of the back of six different carpets woven in Tibet, from, top left, a relatively small Tibetan knot with 84kpsi / 1,302kpsdcm (12 knots across x  7 rows – or lines – of knots high = 84 knots per square inch) to, bottom right, a relatively large Tibetan knot with 18kpsi / 279kpsdcm (6 knots across x 3 rows – or lines – of knots high = 18 knots per square inch); and other size variations in between.

The image above displays a one inch square of the backs of two carpets, the left woven in the Ningxia region (of China), the right woven in Tibet. Note how on the Ningxia both ‘nodes’ of the back of a knot can be seen, whereas on the Tibetan carpet only one ‘node’ can be seen, the other obscured completely from view. In the Ningxia carpet there are 36kpsi / 558kpsdcm (6 knots wide X 6 rows – or lines – of knots high = 36 knots per square inch), while in the Tibetan there are 43kpsi / 666kpsqdcm (9.5 knots wide x 4.5 rows – or  lines – of knots high = 42.75, rounded to 43 knots per square inch.)

The image above displays a one inch square of the backs of a carpet woven in the Ningxia region (of China) on left, and on the right one woven in Tibet. The Ningxia carpet has both warp and weft made of cotton, whereas the one from Tibet in this example has both warp and weft made of wool. [The Ningxia has 6 knots across – and in this example 5 rows high – and shows both the left and right node of the knot, whereas the Tibetan has 9 knots across – and in this example approximately 7 rows high – although only one node of each knot can be seen. Hence when counting knots on Chinese carpets you count every second node across, whereas on a Tibetan carpet you count every node across.]

The image above displays a one inch square of the backs of two carpets woven in Tibet. The carpet on the left has wool warps and a wool wefts, whereas the carpet on the right has cotton warps and a wool wefts.

The image above displays a one inch square of the backs of two carpets woven in Tibet. The carpet on the left has Z-spun wool warps, whereas the carpet on the right has cotton warps that have been Z-spun and then S-plied.

The image above displays a one inch square of the backs of two carpets from Tibet. The one on the left is from a carpet known in Tibet as a Tsuktruk (Tsukdruk) which is somewhat more ‘blanket-like’ with a soft handle, whereas the one on right is from a regular Tibetan carpet. Both have wool warps and wool wefts.

The image above displays a one inch square of the backs of two carpets from Tibet (well, the one on the left is actually an uncut girth strap hole in a saddle carpet). The one on the left has machine spun cotton warps and hand spun wool wefts, whereas the one on the right has hand spun cotton warps and hand spun wool wefts.

The image above displays both hand spun and machine spun cotton; in this case ‘warp’ threads both of which have been Z spun and then S plied. On the the left is the hand spun cotton; note first the irregularity in the thickness of each individual yarn, and hence the irregularity of thickness of each warp thread. This irregularity (in thickness) of each yarn / thread is caused by the variations in the amount of cotton used per yarn when cotton is first spun by hand, and then the individual yarns later plied into a thread (in this case a 7 ply hand spun warp thread). On the right is the machine spun cotton; note the evenness of the both the individual yarns and threads. This evenness / regularity in thickness of both the individual yarn and hence each thread (in this case an 8 ply machine spun warp) is only obtained with automated machine spinning of both the individual ply and then the overall finished thread.

During the 1950’s the Chinese increasingly exerted control over everyday life in Tibet. In March 1959 a massed uprising by Tibetans against this repression took place in the capital Lhasa, at which time the 14th Dalai Lama – Tenzin Gyatso – fearing for his safety and rightly so, fled to exile in India where he was granted political asylum, and remains to this day. His flight set off of a mass exodus of Tibetans, many never to return to their home country. Besides the many Tibetans that followed the Dalai Lama settling in India, many also settled in Nepal, especially in various parts of the Kathmandu valley. From this nucleus Tibetan carpet weaving ‘businesses’ slowly began to be established in Kathmandu, with the weavers making carpets using the Tibetan knotting method. ‘Tibetan’ carpets continue to this day to be woven in Kathmandu and its environs by 2nd and even 3rd generation ‘Nepali Tibetans’, and / or by Nepali people themselves – who prior to the arrival of the Tibetans (in the late 1950’s, and onward) did not have a history of carpet weaving. In this photo, taken circa 1973, three Tibetan refugee women work on knotting a carpet in a workshop on the outskirts of Kathmandu.

A pile of hand spun naturally dyed wool in various colours ready for the loom in a carpet workshop, Bodhanath, Kathmandu, Nepal; circa 2010.

 

 

 

A weaver, circa 2010, sits at her vertical loom in a carpet workshop in Bodhanath, a ‘suburb’ that was once on the very outskirts of Kathmandu (Nepal), but is now just part of the capitals urban sprawl. Note she is using a ‘cartoon’ of the design image drawn to exacting specifications on graph paper – where every square on the graph is equivalent to just one knot – so as to get an exact replica of the design every time this design is reproduced. In days gone by, weavers either copied the design from the back of other carpets or from ‘cartoons’ drawn by hand on parchment; or for a master weaver, sometimes simply from memory. (This is also the reason that with old Tibetan carpets – and produced by any of these latter three ‘methods’ – it is unusual to find any two carpets exactly the same.) For instance, in the picture to the left, note the small oblong drawing just above the center weavers head that simply has the design of the flowers in the ‘medallion’ drawn on it.

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